What are Dental Veneers, and When are They Used?

What are Dental Veneers, and When are They Used?

Dental Venners. Are they right for you?

Strikingly-white, straight, perfect teeth. It’s something we all want – and especially so during our teen years. Whitening kits and toothpastes can help, and sneak-arounds like sipping coffee and soda through a straw can also aid the cause. But what do you do when one of your kid’s teeth gets cracked or chipped – or is genetically off-color or misshapen? Dental veneers may be the answer.

What is a Veneer?

A “veneer” is a wafer-thin layer of material molded to the surface of a tooth to correct a chip or crack, or to enhance its cosmetic appearance. Veneers are made of either porcelain or a composite synthetic resin, such as acrylic polymer or polymethyl methacrylate. These materials are used in dentistry because of their ability to create a strong bond with the tooth, and their ability to mimic the natural color of adjacent teeth. Veneers can either be placed directly onto a tooth at the dental office, or fabricated off-site in a dental laboratory.

Which Type of Veneer is Right for My Child?

There are two types of veneers, and the choice as to which one to use should be made less based on one’s desire (or apprehension of the procedure), and more on the design of your child’s teeth.

  • Traditional Veneers: Traditional veneers are applied to teeth much in the same manner a crown is applied. That is, weak or decayed areas of the tooth are removed, and the tooth is “shaped” to provide a mounting place for the veneer.Even healthy teeth require a minimal amount of re-shaping to ensure a natural look when the veneer is applied. The reason for this is that the veneer itself has a certain degree of thickness, and to not whittle down the tooth would result in a “bulky,” unnatural-looking tooth when compared to adjacent teeth.
  • Prep-less Veneers: On the other hand, with prep-less veneers, there is very little (if any) removal of tooth material. This can be ideal, but is generally limited to situations when there are existing spaces between teeth (like a gap between two front teeth), or when the tooth being treated is smaller than adjacent teeth.

Making the Right Choice

As you can see, deciding on which veneer to choose is as important as the decision to get one in the first place. If you think dental veneers may be an option for your child, speak with your doctor for help in making the right choice.

If you have more questions, please complete the form below.

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Are there Non-Surgical Means of Fixing an Underbite?

Smiles of SpokaneIf you’ve ever had the occasion to speak with someone about how to correct an under bite, your conversation no doubt centered on the painful idea of having to “break” the jawbone, weeks on a liquid diet because of a jaw that was then wired shut, and the application of braces both before and after surgery. Understandably, such conversations tend to elicit a lot of wincing from any parent considering the same for their child. There are alternatives, however, IF you act early.

Why it’s Important to Act Early

When a child is young, the bones in their jaw are more malleable and welcoming to adjustment than at a later age. If treatment is delayed until later in life, the “tender” jawbones of a child become fused to such a degree that surgery presents itself as the only option. The options we’ll discuss below play upon this particular window of opportunity.

  1. Expanders:  As is the case when a child has a crossbite, initial treatment for an underbite typically involves the use of an expander to adjust the spread of a child’s teeth so the bite matches evenly on all sides. Expanders resemble orthodontic retainers, and include a screw that is tightened nightly so as to “spread” a child’s bite to the prescribed measurements.
  2. Braces: If a child is presented with a minor underbite restricted to tooth overcrowding, braces alone can sometimes alleviate the concern. Most often, however, braces are used in conjunction with, or as a precursor to a headgear appliance, which can apply a more direct, and significant, amount of “pull-pressure” to the lower jawbone.
  3. Reverse-pull Face Mask (with or without a chincap): Sometimes used in combination with or after an expander, headgear can provide additional stimulation and directional guidance to a jaw not wanting to develop in the correct fashion. Headgear works by applying forward “pull pressure” to the jaw by resting atop the face, and connecting to either braces or an expander contained within the mouth.
  4. Veneers: Very mild underbites can be cosmetically altered with veneers so the teeth give the appearance of no underbite. There is a good degree of artistry with this approach, and when done correctly, this creative placement of veneers on the upper jaw mimics a jaw in proper alignment.

Fixing an under bite doesn’t have to be fraught with expense and pain if dealt with in a timely fashion. Speak early and often with your dentist and orthodontist about the options available to your child. If you have any questions please call our office or complete the form below.

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