Summer Vacation Ready Smiles

Summer Vacation Ready Smiles

Summer ReadySummer is here and so is the fun vacation you spent all year planning for!

So, while you’re thinking about where you’ll go, where you’ll eat, and what you’ll see along the way, don’t forget to plan a visit to your dentist as well. Doing so can save you from the misery of a dental emergency that will surely spoil even the best planned getaway.

The Best Plan of Action

Now, we’re pretty sure, visiting the dentist is the last thing you want to do before a relaxing vacation. Yet we’re also fairly certain that discovering a painful cavity mid-trip isn’t on the agenda either – especially if you’re going overseas.

Can you imagine having to look for emergency dental care in some remote part of the world?

Ouch!

Truth is, a quick check-up can catch a future crisis before it ever materializes, and this is one of the beautiful things about dentistry.

Imagine, for example, if you had a bone in your leg that was weak for one reason or another, and a strong impact upon that leg could cause it to break. Nine times out of ten, you would never even know you had this issue until your leg actually broke and you were laying in the emergency room.

With dentistry, however, oral exams, x-rays and other tools allow your dentist to ferret out problems before they present themselves, and that’s why visiting prior to vacation can help.

So, about a month prior to departure – or at least two weeks before you go – schedule a visit. Your dentist will explore your mouth for any loose crowns or teeth that could cause a problem, and identify any cavities that are close enough to the nerve to cause an abscess or pain.

If you’re traveling by plane, air-pressure in the cabin can cause a recently drilled tooth to be overly sensitive, so you’ll want to be certain to plan your visit at least a month ahead of time if you’re flying.

Of course, any surgery such as the removal of wisdom teeth, or a root canal should be scheduled in significant advance, and if you wear braces, you’ll want to visit your orthodontist as well.

Visiting your dentist prior to vacation might actually be one of the easiest things to plan this summer. You’ll depart with a fresh clean mouth, and the confidence that a sneaking dental emergency won’t be appearing in your vacation scrapbook this year.

If you have more questions, please complete the form below.

  • Email Us Today

Things You Should Know about Your Teeth as You Age

Smiles-of-Spokane-Aging-TeethIf you’ve ever considered the prospect of living without teeth as you age, it’s probably caused you considerable amount of distress just thinking about it. Multiple tooth loss can indeed be traumatic and costly, and, for some, the remedies are less than ideal. That said, you’ll be pleased to know that aging itself isn’t much of a contributor to tooth loss, and that many people live their entire lives with nearly all of their natural teeth intact. So what’s the best way to ensure you’re among this coveted group?

Let’s face it. We all want to keep our natural teeth. Here are a few ways to ensure you do just that as you move along in years. And remember, there is no defined age where problems start to arise, so thinking ahead regardless of your current age is always a good idea.

  • Periodontal Disease: Without a doubt, periodontal disease is the number one destroyer of smiles. There is no cure for this leading cause of adult tooth loss in North America, and once it begins, it can only be proactively and professionally managed. So, here’s the familiar refrain: maintain your regular visits, and if you’re placed on a periodic maintenance routine where you visit your dentist more than twice a year, be sure to keep those appointments. Keeping those appointments will help you keep your teeth.
  • Systemic Disease: There are a host of diseases that can adversely affect oral health, (diabetes, heart disease, etc.) so being mindful of this connection, and maintaining an open door of communication with your doctor and dentist while undergoing treatment may help you minimize the effects these diseases can have on your teeth.
  • Poor Habits: We all know a diet high in sugar, starch and acid harms surface enamel and lessens a tooth’s ability to protect itself from decay. You may not know, however, that smokingand excessive alcohol consumption can also do significant harm. For example, both cigarette smoke and alcohol rob gum tissue of the moisture needed to keep it healthy, leaving it acidic and prone to decay, and smoking can interrupt the mouth’s natural healing mechanisms. More benign habits can also damage teeth and consistently gnawing on objects not designed to be in the mouth all day, like pencils, pipes, paper clips and ice cubes, are not good habits to pursue. Additionally, using your teeth as a vice to open bottles and rip apart bags is best left to those among us committed to losing teeth, not keeping them.
  • Prescription Medication: Lastly, certain prescription medicines can dry out the mouth in ways similar to smoking and alcohol, so if you’re taking prescription drugs, be sure to keep your hydration in check as per your doctor’s recommendations, or use chewing gum with Xylitol to help maintain saliva production throughout the day.

So, as you can see, allowing your “permanent” teeth to live up their name really isn’t that difficult. The old TV image of every grandpa throughout the land dropping his teeth into a bedside jar at the close of the day is far from a reality for the majority of today’s seniors, and it doesn’t have to be for you either. Maintain a solid oral care routine, and ask your care providers about keeping a healthy mouth throughout your years, and you’ll be well on your way to ensuring your teeth stay just where you want them to be – in your mouth.

If you have more questions, please complete the form below.

  • Email Us Today

Chipped Tooth? We have a Simple Fix!

Chipped ToothIf your smile has an imperfection you’ve always wanted to fix, Smiles of Spokane may have an easy solution for you called cosmetic bonding. In fact, you may already be familiar with the bonding process and the materials used if you’ve had a cavity repaired using a tooth colored filling. The same material is used in cosmetic bonding to correct blemishes, gaps and irregular sized teeth because of its ability to mimic the color and translucency of our actual teeth. The procedure is also fairly simple, and can be completed in our office with very little or no preparation.

How Is the Process Completed?

Think of cosmetic bonding as being similar to sculpting. Since it is used most frequently to correct chipped or gapped teeth, when Dr. Rogers works with the bonding material, he assumes the role of artist as well as dentist, seeking to restore your smile to its most realistic look, feel and luminescence. First, the tooth is prepared by etching it to allow the bonding material to adhere to the tooth. This process is painless, and requires no anesthesia. Then, the bonding material is applied in layers to the tooth to maximize its strength and to create a look that most resembles your natural tooth. Once the desired look has been achieved, the composite is hardened with an ultra-violet light, and shaped and polished into its final form.

How Long Will My Tooth Bonding Last?

While tooth bonding can’t compare to the strength nature has given our teeth, it does come relatively close. With care, a bonded tooth can last ten to fifteen years for most patients when attention is paid to good dietary and eating habits. For example, as with your natural teeth, liquids such as wine and coffee can stain a bond over time, particularly where the bond meets the natural tooth. Also, if a bond exists on the biting edge of a tooth – as it would be in the case of a chipped front tooth – it can be vulnerable to breakage. Refraining from snapping into a carrot using a bonded tooth, then, would be a good idea. The biting of such foods can easily be diverted to one’s side teeth, therefore protecting the integrity of the bonded tooth.

How Do I care for My Bonded Tooth?

Take care of a bonded tooth the same way as you care for all the other teeth. Regular brushing and flossing is key, and some dentists may even suggest a maintenance routine with a hygienist specifically skilled in maintaining bonded teeth. When brushing at home, you’ll want to be sure to use toothpaste that is geared toward the cleaning and care of bonded teeth – two good toothpastes to try are SuperSmile and Rembrandt. Supersmile can be difficult to find in stores, but most dentist offices carry the line. Lastly, limiting your intake of alcohol is not only good for oral heath, but doing so also helps protect the bonding material from premature wear.

If you have any more questions about bonding, be sure to call our office or complete the form below. Bonding is one of the most affordable dental procedures available, and can benefit your smile and your self-confidence tremendously.

Broke a tooth? Don’t Panic

SOS-Broken-ToothThis nice Spring weather brings hours of fun outdoor activities for your children. It also brings the opportunity for accidents such as a chipped or broken tooth. Would you know what to do?

Rule number 1: Don’t Panic. Easier said than done, but keep this thought in the back of your mind: your dentist sees this all the time, and it’s no big deal. Of course, to your little one it’s a very big deal, and there are a couple things you can do to ease the temporary pain… Read on!

  • First, provide comfort. It’s hard to do much else when your little one is in pain. Let them know it’s going to be okay. Try getting your little one to rinse their mouth with cold water, and apply a cold compress to their face to reduce swelling.
  • Then, assess the situation. Ask to see inside their mouth and identify the tooth (or teeth) in question. Before you leave the scene of the crime, look for the tooth or tooth fragments that may have fallen. If it was a baby tooth that chipped or fell out, do not try to put it back. Instead, put it in a safe place in case your dentist wants to see it. If a permanent tooth was affected, either preserve it in a clean container in a moist solution (cold milk, water, saliva), or place the tooth back into the socket and have your child bite down gently on some gauze or a piece of cloth. This is the route you want to go if you can make it to the dentist immediately. Alternatively, you can keep “Save-a-Tooth” on hand in your first-aid kit.
  • Call Dr. Rogers. (509) 838-4165) It doesn’t matter what time of day, or day of the week, we can help you with your emergency. And, of course, you’re in luck if the tooth situation occurs during normal business hours. Let us know what happened and schedule your appointment. If you are unable to get the after-hours emergency line, you might want to take your child into the emergency room to get assessed.
  • Don’t worry or assume the worst. It’s easy to let your mind wander to the ways a missing tooth will affect your child’s development, speech, or popularity. But this is when we give thanks for the wonders of modern dentistry. Your dentist will come up with a treatment plan to fix your child’s smile in no time.
  • Invest in a custom mouthguard? At your appointment, ask Dr. Rogers what he thinks. If your child loves hockey or is especially accident-prone, this may be a great option.

There you have it! Relax, know it will be okay, and laugh with your little one about the cuteness of their toothless smile.